Interrupting a Two Millennia Long Conversation: Sophocles, Aristotle, and Antigone

At the beginning of the semester, in EN 314-H: Law and Literature, we studied Sophocles’ play Antigone (circa 440 B.C.) as our first major text. As a quick plot summary, two brothers, Polynices and Eteocles, kill each other in a civil war over the ancient city of Thebes. Then, the newly elected king – their uncle Creon – … More Interrupting a Two Millennia Long Conversation: Sophocles, Aristotle, and Antigone

Is justice attainable through the legal system?

by Mahi Serekberhan Law and literature have been entwined since antiquity: from Cicero and Aristotle, who discussed law and its application as early as 350 B.C, to Camus and Kafka, who questioned and portrayed its means and end. Today’s writers continue to produce literature that discusses law and its implementation. One might ask why—why is … More Is justice attainable through the legal system?

Effects of The Supreme Court on Indian Reservations

For my final paper in Honors: Law & Literature, I looked at Constitutional Law cases and the adverse effects they have had on the governing of Indian Reservations. Historically, the Supreme Court tends to be on the right side of history. In 1954, Brown v. Board of Education, the Court ended the legal practice of segregation,  reversing … More Effects of The Supreme Court on Indian Reservations

What is Death? What is Sanity? — What is meant to be

Edgar Allan Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart gives us a story of an old man, the narrator, and three policemen who all float around the inevitable theme of death. The narrator being the person to cause the premeditated murder, the old man being the one who dies, and the three policemen being the ones to investigate […] … More What is Death? What is Sanity? — What is meant to be